September 3, 2010

Benguet: For Example, A Flower

  —Arkaye Kierulf, “For Example, A Flower” Flowers of Atok and Kabayan, Benguet    
September 22, 2010

Benguet: Black-and-White Photographs

What, I wondered, would the visual world be like for those born totally colorblind? Would they, perhaps, lacking any sense of something missing, have a world no less dense and vibrant than our own? Might they even have developed heightened perceptions of visual tone and texture and movement and depth, and live in a world in some ways more intense than our own, a world of heightened reality—one that we can only glimpse echoes of in the work of the great black-and-white photographers? Might they indeed see us as peculiar, distracted by trivial or irrelevant aspects of the visual world, […]
January 12, 2011
Backpacking with a Book

Mt. Pulag: The Laid-back and the Killer

Should human conquer the mountain or should they wish for the mountain to possess them? Sherpas went up and down ten times in some cases, without glory, without claim of ownership, and there were those said it was sacred and shouldn’t be sullied at all.―Kiran Desai, The Inheritance of Loss We opted to linger on Baguio and experienced the Death Road ride, explored Mt. Timbak, visited the centuries-old mummies, so we could not possibly join the other group journeying the killer trail—Akiki, which necessitates longer time. Those who opted to trail Ambangeg were often asked why they chose the relatively […]
April 26, 2011

SUNSTAR: Places of Memories

 [Past] does change. The present changes the past. Looking back you do not find what you left behind. —Kiran Desai, The Inheritance of Loss A traveler intrudes upon the privacy of a place. Yet, is it possible to be part of its privacy in a time too limited, too short, too constrained? Possibly not. To reconcile the gap between time and understanding the place, one creates a version of the place on memories. And the place becomes truthful, sincere to memory. Mt. Timbak: The Mini-Calvary Experience the relief of being an unknown transplant to the locals and hide the perspective […]